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Hiroshima and Nagasaki Remembered

August 6, 2009

(Picture Source)

Warning: This video may contain disturbing images.

Original Poem: Nâzım Hikmet
Music: Zülfü Livaneli
Performance: Joan Baez

It’s me knocking at the doors,
The doors – one by one,
I’m not visible to your eyes,
The dead are invisible.

Since I died at Hiroshima,
almost ten years have passed.
I’m a seven year old girl
Dead children do not grow up.

First my hair caught fire
Then my eyes burnt out
I became a handful of ashes
My ashes blown in the air.

I’m knocking at your door
Aunts and uncles, give me a signature
So the children won’t be killed
And so they can eat candy.

Translated by Yurtsever1923

Chitose Hajime and Ryuichi Sakamoto performed a Japanese version of the song in 2005 (死んだ女の子, Dead Girl).

Graphical recreation of pre-bombing Hiroshima [via Japan Probe]

Toshie Une is an atomic bomb survivor [via Japan Probe]

This is a brief list of the current and some past coverage. The US survey results are sad…

7 comments

  1. Nâzım Hikmet is one of the most well-known poets here in Turkey.And this poem (the original, in turkish) is my favorite.I hope the world won’t forget about this and this poem helps them to feel those people’s pain.


  2. Nazım Hikmet is a very well-known poet here in Turkey. And this poem (it’s more beautiful in turkish, though) is my favorite. I hope the world never forgets about this and this poem helps them to remember…


    • Indeed, he is a great poet🙂

      Yes, we should never forget.


  3. sorry for the double post:)


  4. We never did learn in detail about this during high school, so I heard most of the details from my father and grandfather. It’s horrible, without a doubt. I believe words can’t describe what I want to say at all. After reading the survey, I can’t say that the Americans are wrong either, as they were also victims of the war once. It’s pretty difficult to judge who is right and who is wrong here. ):


    • Indeed, words can’t describe such things sometimes.

      Yes, it is not easy, but people don’t learn much from history.



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